Image from page 503 of “Northward over the great ice : a narrative of life and work along the shores and upon the interior ice-cap of northern Greenland in the years 1886 and 1891-1897, with a description of the little tribe of Smith Sound Eskimos, the mo

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Image from page 503 of “Northward over the great ice : a narrative of life and work along the shores and upon the interior ice-cap of northern Greenland in the years 1886 and 1891-1897, with a description of the little tribe of Smith Sound Eskimos, the mo
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Identifier: northwardovergre001pear
Title: Northward over the great ice : a narrative of life and work along the shores and upon the interior ice-cap of northern Greenland in the years 1886 and 1891-1897, with a description of the little tribe of Smith Sound Eskimos, the most northerly human beings in the world, and an account of the discovery and bringing home of the Saviksue or great Cape York meteorites
Year: 1898 (1890s)
Authors: Peary, Robert E. (Robert Edwin), 1856-1920
Subjects: Eskimos
Publisher: New York, NY : F.A. Stokes Company
Contributing Library: Wellesley College Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

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THE HARBOUR PICTURESQUE IN NIGHT SHADOWS. To Dr. Cooks care may be attributed the almostcomplete exemption of the party from even themildest indispositions, and personally I owe much tohis professional skill, and unrufTfled patience and cool-ness in an emergency. In addition to his work in hisspecial ethnological field, in which he has obtained alarge mass of most valuable material concerning a 4-4 Northward over the Great Ice practically unstudied tribe, he was always helpful andan indefatigable worker. Verhoeff, besides contributing generously to theexpense of the expedition, was devoted to his meteoro-logical and tidal observations and made a completeand valuable series of both. Gibson, a natural hunter, quick with rifle and gun,in addition to his ornithological work, contributedmore largely than any other member of the party toour supply of game.

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FIRE-SWEPT ST, JOHNS. Astriip, a young Norwegian, a boy in years, but aman in grit and endurance, was one among a thousandfor the long and lonely journey during which he wasmy sole companion. Henson, my faithful coloured boy, a hard workerand apt at anything, being in turn cook, hunter, dogdriver, housekeeper, and body-guard, showed himself,in powers of endurance and ability to withstand cold,the equal of others in the party. My acknowledgments of my obligations to themembers of my party would be incomplete without Search for Verhoeff—Homeward Voyage 425 reference to Mrs. Peary. Outside of the unspeakablecomfort of her soothing presence in the time when atthe threshold of a field of effort, in which pure brutephysical fitness and strength are a sine qua non, Ifound myself a helpless cripple, I feel that I speakwithout prejudice when I say that to her womanly

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Image from page 468 of “The fireside university of modern invention, discovery, industry and art for home circle study and entertainment” (1902)
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Identifier: firesideuniversi01mcgo
Title: The fireside university of modern invention, discovery, industry and art for home circle study and entertainment
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: McGovern, John. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Science
Publisher: Chicago, Union pub. house
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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Fig. 162. FASHIONING GLASS SHADES. How is this Glass bowl made ? A man gathers molten Glass on a rod and holds it over the GLASS. 423 mold; the pressman clips off the hot metal with shears; themass drops into the mold; the mold is shut and pressed andthe bowl is taken out, still red hot. It can now be furtherheated, wrought with a block of wood, and is cooled in a temper-ing oven. How are the molds made ? They are of iron, jointed in many places, so that they can beopened without breaking the Glass. When a vase or pitcheris smaller at the top than some part of its interior, it has beenwrought with the wooden block; ory it has been moldedanother way.

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Fig. 163. MOLDING COMMON TUMBLERS. How can Glass be molded in any other way ? The rod, or Blowing Tube, which gathered the metal inthe pot, may have been hollow. The blower, a man usually ofenormous lung-power, by gathering a pound or so at a time, 4-J4 THE FIRESIDE UNIVERSITY. and making many dips, may finally have a heavy load on theend of his tube. He may now place this mass in a mold whichhas no core, and by mere lung-power, blowing into the mass,may force its outer sides into every crevice of the mold. How are the letters and figures made that we see on goblets,druggists bottles, ete. These designs are engraved, with great art, into the sides ofthe metal molds. As these have been cast, polished andhinged at great expense, the artist must make no mistakenmove with his chisel. Complicated designs sometimes requiremonths of labor in the engravers hands. The cost of themolds for a table set is from ,000 to ,000. What isthcGluheynt It is a hot oven or sub-furnace. Here the rough s

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Image from page 723 of “[Frost and fire : natural engines, tool-marks and chips : with sketches taken at home and abroad by a traveller]” (1864)
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Identifier: frostfirenatural04camp
Title: [Frost and fire : natural engines, tool-marks and chips : with sketches taken at home and abroad by a traveller]
Year: 1864 (1860s)
Authors: Campbell, J. F. (John Francis), 1822-1885
Subjects: Glaciers Meteorology Geology
Publisher: [Edinburgh : s.n.
Contributing Library: National Library of Scotland
Digitizing Sponsor: National Library of Scotland

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rld,though the prevailing feature in its landscapes may be dustand ashes. 12 GEOLOGY. Atiiiosplieiic circulation, -water falling and flowing, fluidand solid ; sliding glaciers, freezing seas, ice rafts floating,rocks wearing, sediment falling to form new beds, denuda-tion, and deposition:—downward movements from theaction of cold and weight :— Eising land, hot springs, intruded rocks, lava, boiling, rising,flowing, and freezing ; volcanic projectiles rising, freezing,and falling in air; upheaval of land, upward movements ingas, fluid and solid, caused by heat:— Demolition and reconstruction by natural forces,—are notall within daily experience at home. Therefore, teaching and experience may seem to differ,but they really agree; for natural agents work everywherein the same way, and the form of their work is alike at homeand abroad, on the smallest and on the largest visible scale.The same powers work in a kettle, and in the Great Geyser;both boil, and sometimes they boil over.

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Fii;. 2. n.iiLiNii UP.Tube and liiihiu ot tin; Great Ut-yacr, after an Eiiiptiuii, ISiJJ. CHAPTEll IT I. GEOLOGY. Geology teaches generally that great changes have taken placeon the surface of the earth, and it seems to point back to somedistant time when a crust first cooled about a molten interior. But there is nothing like a molten surface within commonexperience. The world with which we are familiar is greenand smiling, and the old rugged crust is buried far out ofsiglit, or worn away. It takes skilled eyes to read the lessonsof our rocks. In Iceland nearly the whole surface has beenfused ; it is warm still in many places, and most of the rocksare bare, so he who rides reads. The modern geologist generally works slowly but surelydownwards through the outer crust of sedimentary rockswhich have settled layer upon layer above each other, andabout the cooled surface of the first crust, whose formation isassumed in the meantime. From sedimentary beds he digsout the shapes of creatures

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