Cool Cool Home Interior images

By | March 29, 2018

Some cool cool home interior images:

Image from page 39 of “North America : with an especially full treatment of the United States and its dependencies” (1900)
cool home interior
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Identifier: northamericawith00tarr
Title: North America : with an especially full treatment of the United States and its dependencies
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: Tarr, Ralph S. (Ralph Stockman), 1864-1912 McMurry, Frank Morton, 1862-1936, joint author
Subjects: Geography
Publisher: New York : Macmillan
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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s areshortest, though still warm, excellent wheat is raised; farther-south, corn is the principal crop; and in the southern part,where the summers are longest and hottest, tobacco, cotton,sugar-cane, and rice are grown. How different it would be if a great mountain systemextended east and west across the continent! The warm sum- 12 A GENERAL STUDY OF NORTH AMERICA nier winds could not, then, carry their warm th and moisture sofar north; neither could the north winds, which are cool insummer and cold in winter, reach so far south. The northwinds are very important; they moderate the heat of summerand bring cool weather in winter. Sometimes they do damagein winter by causing destructive frosts, even as far south asFlorida. Then the orange and lemon trees suffer greatly. Batthey also do good, for too much heat takes away the vigor ofthe people, while cool air makes them more active. The Great Ice Age. — Long after the coal beds wereformed and the great highlands and valleys were built,

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 11. A picture of the Cornell glacier in Greenland. It is a great waste of ice,slowly moving down from the interior to the coast and ending in the sea,where icebergs break off and float away. Some of these may be seen inthe picture (see also Fig. 12). another very important event happened in the preparationof this continent for our home. That was the forma-tion of a great ice sheet, or glacier, which covered a largepart of northern North America. Ibis glacier had muchto do with making the lakes, waterfalls, and even the soilitself, in that section. PHYSIOGRAPHY OF NORTH AMERICA 13

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 15 of “Alberta : a survey of the topography, climate, resources, industries, transportation and communication, and institutional services of the Province of Alberta” (1919)
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Identifier: albertasurveyoft00mcca
Title: Alberta : a survey of the topography, climate, resources, industries, transportation and communication, and institutional services of the Province of Alberta
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors: McCaig, J Alberta. Dept. of Agriculture
Subjects: Agriculture
Publisher: Edmonton, Alta. : Issued under the direction of Minister of Agriculture
Contributing Library: ASC – York University Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Ontario Council of University Libraries and Member Libraries

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em, made up of the north andsouth branches and such important tributaries as the Battle, RedDeer, the Bow and Belly Rivers, drains all the rest of the provinceexcept a small portion in the south. The general slope of the Sask-atchewan system is easterly or north-easterly. The Saskatchewanis part of the Nelson River system which flows into Hudsons Bayfrom Lake Winnipeg. Both branches of the Saskatchewan arenavigable, but the current is rather rapid, and navigation on theserivers is not developed to a great extent. All the important riversof Alberta flow at a considerable depth below the prairie, particularlyon the western side of the province. They offer great possibilitiesfor the development of water power, but this has not yet been madeuse of. In the southern part of the province the Milk River, which isconnected with the Mississippi system, enters the province and flowsthrough Canadian territory for a distance of about sixty milesnot far from the International Boundar 13 f ^ li II

Text Appearing After Image:
The Better Farm Homes 14 CLIMATE AND WEATHER Climate.—The climate of Alberta is of very attractive qualityand this quality has a ver^ important bearing on the possibilitiesof development northward and on industrial and more particularlyagricultural activities. The climate of the interior provinces ofCanada is described as extreme. The winters are subject to lowdips of temperature and the summers are quite hot. Alberta,however, by reason of contiguity to the coast province has a rathermoderate climate. The winters are relieved by periodical relaxationof cold, and the summers, while rather dry and warm in the harvestseason, are always cool at nights. This results in crisp vegetationand a period of satisfactory rest and repair for people. The pre-cipitation of the province is between fifteen and twenty inches.It is rather heavier in Central Alberta than it is in either Northernor Southern Alberta, though the difference in precipitation in thesedifferent sections is not very great. An

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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